Tuesday, July 19, 2005
Napoleon Dynamite

Napoleon Dynamite

A Comedy of Nihilism

Continuing a tradition of ‘entertainment’ that began with Gummo.

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Sunday, July 03, 2005
Land of the Dead

Land of the Dead

America at Large

It’s a liberal’s nightmare: a whole nation of zombies questing for the American dream.

By K.P. ::: (3) Comments

Other Recent Long Stuff

Up
Sympathy for the Devil
Watchmen
The Maltese Falcon
Neo’s Passport
The Dark Knight
A Copy of a Copy of a Copy
The Dreamers
The Dreamers
Reading Inland Empire

Books to Phlog

Understanding Jaques EllulUnderstanding Jacques Ellul, by Greenman, Schuchardt, and Toly, will be of special interest to Metaphilm readers as Jacques Ellul understood cinema as one of the chief tools of propaganda used by the state to distract the masses from that which matters.

Metaphlog

Friday, July 08, 2005

Announcing the Metaphilm Movie Mapper!

We are pleased to announce the beta release of the Metaphilm Movie Mapper, the companion website to the newly released Manhattan on Film by Chuck Katz, self-described geographreak and expert, surprisingly enough, on all things relating to film in Manhattan and surrounds.

On our Mapper, you can search by movie, actor, director, street address, or year and find all the locations where your favorite films were shot or set. We’ve got screen shots and recent real-life shots for many locations, and there’s a convenient link to Yahoo! Maps so you can find your way there yourself.

While the mapper is still in beta (your .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) most welcome, dear reader), the book is absolutely flawless and is a must-have for anyone living in or visiting Manhattan.

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Tuesday, July 05, 2005

Land of the Dead

While editing K.P.’s interpretation of Land of the Dead, it occurred to me that another way to see the film is as the movie adaptation of What’s the Matter with Kansas?, that book favored by liberals all across America.

While her piece didn’t make me want to actually see the movie (I live outside DC—I need to go spend money for liberal rage?), the quick review from Tim Cavanaugh at Reason has made me think again. With Romero, it’s not just politics. It’s personal. And apparently, it’s funny and manages to overcome its propaganda.

Cavanaugh: “. . . [I]f you’re going to stick with authorial intent, you have to be content with some strong though not doctrinaire lefty politics. I say if you’re going to do an anti-market screed, this is the way to do it. . . . I have to admit, Land of the Dead reminded me of how invigorating full-throated lefty agitprop can be in an entertaining movie.

Considering we’re already getting alternative interpretations in our comments, it sounds like a meta success to me.

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Friday, July 01, 2005

Ralph Winter

Movies are not good at giving answers. Movies are great at asking questions. Movies that do that are lasting.” —Fantastic Four and X-Men Producer Ralph Winter, in an interview with Christianity Today. (The rest of the interview is worth reading; breaks through several stereotypes.)

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Other Recent Phlogs

Bollywood Directors and the “Cut To Switzerland”
The Constant Traveler
Save the Movies from Save The Cat!
Propaganda, A Primer
It may actually be long After Midnight
Dirty Wars playing, then disappearing, at a theater near you
Luke’s Change:  An Inside Job
What Does Hollywood Have to Do with Jerusalem?
There are only fourteen books worth reading each year
Why Are Foreign Films So… Foreign?
Tree of Life Shooting Locations in Smithville, Texas
The Movie Theater is Officially Dead
If 2001 Came Out in 2012
Apple’s New iPhone Best Explained by the Movie The Prestige
You know You’ve Seen Star Wars Too Many Times When…
When Search Engine Metrics Get… Awkward
The Cinema IS the New Cathedral
The Truman Show as DSM V Category
When You Have to Run and Pee During the Film
True Grit and Canada