Tuesday, April 16, 2002
A Beautiful Mind

A Beautiful Mind

A Beautiful Delusion

A mathematician imagines that there is more to life than what can be touched, but it’s just his schizophrenia talking.

By Tommy Viola ::: philms ::: (2) Comments ::: Read the whole thing

Comments

1

The Nash-character’s problem was not that he “imagined that there is more to life than what can be touched,” but that he could not distinguish between that which could be sensed (“touched, tasted,” etc.) and that which could only be imagined, thought, or emotionally felt. It was not that he believed in the abstract, but that he perceived it as the concrete. This, of course, is what marks someone as “delusional.”

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 26 Jul 03 at 04:46 AM
2

This is absurd. The movie was about an actual disease which effects perception of reality.  Why don’t you walk into a mental hospital and tell the doctors to let everyone go, they’re actually experiencing God? Seeing film through a theological lens is one thing, but grossly misinterpreting a movie to try and make a point is another.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 15 Apr 11 at 03:17 PM

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