Sunday, May 04, 2008

The Dreamers

(Part 2 of 2)

By Steven Q. Fletcher ::: continued ::: (6) Comments ::: Read the whole thing

Comments

1

Great analysis of the film, thank you.  I agree with you that there wasn’t a consummated threesome at the end—the female character wanted to commit suicide out of shame of her knowledge that at least one of her parents saw them all together—shame of the appearance of a threesome. 

I think the point is that the two French characters are very immature—their sexuality isn’t mature, committed sexuality but childish games.  The entrance of the American represents the demand that his French friends grow up—all the incest or near incest, etc., is all from a lingering childhood experimentation and it’s time for both of them to get real partners and leave that stuff behind.  The fact that they’re still financially dependent upon their parents adds to this impression, and the fact that they try to maintain an innocent facade for their parents also adds to the impression of their immaturity.

But this is a point at which I disagree with you—I think this is all about the 1968 Revolution, and that Bert. is using these incestous characters to comment upon the revolution: that it is an incestous, immature movement, that it is children rebelling against parents upon whom they are still dependent, that it is unproductive and childish, that the participants need to grow up, and that what’s happening in America is, for Bert., what makes what’s happening in France in 1968 seem so immature.  May not agree with Bert’s view of the 1968 riots in France, but I think that’s what it was and why he made the film with these characters…who in the end participated when the American walked away.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 09 Jun 08 at 01:03 AM
2

I found the critique very helpful, especially the annotation of texts and context.  Still, a failure to discuss the psychological dimension, the infernal and incestual menage a trois, frustrated what might have been an excellent assessment.  The cinema as a catechism for coming into self-awareness might be the greater theme, but this in conflict with the youths’ resistance to the possibility that their dream will be spoiled—and their pubescent escape into the inner sanctum—all of this points to the difficulty of transitioning to full adulthood.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 09 Jan 09 at 02:38 PM
3

Wow, excellent analysis.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 30 Mar 09 at 01:05 AM
4

I can’t imagine why you managed to spend the time to write 2 pages of analysis of what was a garbage movie about garbage people by a garbage director. This was a movie that clearly reached it’s peak at the “the end” graphic…..........

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 02 Feb 10 at 10:50 PM
5

Because it’s not a garbage movie?

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 02 Feb 10 at 10:54 PM
6

I thought the analysis absolutely brilliant. The level of detail in the analysis is phenomenal!

The movie reminded me a lot of American Beauty, mainly because of the atmosphere that always makes you feel “This is going to end badly”. There, too, the attempt to break out of societal confinement is eventually punished.

Posted by Marc Chehab on 14 Mar 11 at 01:01 AM

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